August312014

We should think of codenames. We’re government agents now, we should have secret codenames.”

(Source: x-menunited)

3PM
athingforthevillains:

I’m crying

athingforthevillains:

I’m crying

3PM
youarerageandserenity:

Inspired by this post 
Quote paraphrased from Megamind
chlresxavier I told you I’d do it. 

youarerageandserenity:

Inspired by this post 

Quote paraphrased from Megamind

chlresxavier I told you I’d do it. 

2PM

Wicked songs explained

  • No One Mourns the Wicked: The catchy celebratory song relating to a death.
  • Dear Old Shiz: The song that eases us into a flashback
  • The Wizard and I: A song filled with an unbelievable amount of irony and foreshadowing.
  • What is this feeling?: The song with sexual tension.
  • Something Bad: The song that helps build the plot.
  • Dancing Through life: The YOLO song
  • Popular: The song that hints Galinda's crush on Elphie.
  • I'm Not That Girl: The beautiful but sad song.
  • One Short Day: The fun song.
  • Sentimental Man: The Wizard's innocent song
  • Defying Gravity: The empowering song that teaches you to be strong, independent, and make brooms fly with the right spell.
  • Thanks Goodness: The song that's actually very sad.
  • Wicked Witch of the East: The song they should have included on the album.
  • Wonderful: The Wizard's song in attempt to get you back on his side.
  • I'm Not That Girl (Reprise): The 'wow what a plot twist' song.
  • As Long As You're Mine: The passionate love song
  • No Good Deed: The song that will send chills down your spine.
  • March of the Witch Hunters: The song that's kinda gruesome.
  • For Good: The song that will have you bawling your eyes out
  • Finale: The song that will shatter your heart into many pieces and have you scheduling your next therapy appointment because you're not emotionally okay.
2PM

archiemcphee:

19-year-old Queen’s University engineering student David Chesney spent four years building a wooden roller coaster in his parents’ backyard in Toronto, CA. He calls it the Minotaur and it was built using used scrap wood, steel plating and his uncle’s tools. The homemade coaster measures 12 ft tall and 92 ft long and features two ~12 ft drops. Chesney says the coaster’s steel car can reach speeds of 20 km/h.

“My dad didn’t like the idea at all from the beginning,” Chesney explained to the Toronto Star. “Mom was kinda, ‘Uhhhh, I guess so.’ I don’t think that either of them understood the scope of what I had in mind.”

“It just got bigger,” he added. “Then it got to the point where my parents said ‘it’s huge but you’ve gotten this far so just finish it and then take it down after.’ ”

Click here for video of the Minotaur in action and visit David Chesney’s Minotaur Facebook Page lots of process photos.

[via The Independent]

2PM
seeinnovation:

Award-winning Game: Meta!Blast: The Leaf is a game that immerses the player in the action on and in a leaf. Intended as a supplement to in-class instruction for high school students, it lets users pilot a miniature bioship across a strange landscape, which features nematodes and a lumbering tardigrade. Users can dive into individual cells and zoom around a chloroplast, activating photosynthesis with their ship’s search lamp. By conveying the complexity and visual interest of a biological system, Eve Wurtele and her team seek to increase student engagement with science and encourage a strong foundation in STEM.
This entry was a People’s Choice winner in the newly renamed science and engineering visualization challenge: The Vizzies.
Credit: Eve Syrkin Wurtele, William Schneller, Paul Klippel, Greg Hanes, Andrew Navratil and Diane Bassham, Iowa State University

Do you love animating data, creating science apps, or taking macrophotographs? In the 2014 Visualization Challenge, sponsored by the National Science Foundation and Popular Science, your handiwork can receive its due glory and win you cash prizes. Find out more here.

seeinnovation:

Award-winning Game: Meta!Blast: The Leaf is a game that immerses the player in the action on and in a leaf. Intended as a supplement to in-class instruction for high school students, it lets users pilot a miniature bioship across a strange landscape, which features nematodes and a lumbering tardigrade. Users can dive into individual cells and zoom around a chloroplast, activating photosynthesis with their ship’s search lamp. By conveying the complexity and visual interest of a biological system, Eve Wurtele and her team seek to increase student engagement with science and encourage a strong foundation in STEM.

This entry was a People’s Choice winner in the newly renamed science and engineering visualization challenge: The Vizzies.

Credit: Eve Syrkin Wurtele, William Schneller, Paul Klippel, Greg Hanes, Andrew Navratil and Diane Bassham, Iowa State University

Do you love animating data, creating science apps, or taking macrophotographs? In the 2014 Visualization Challenge, sponsored by the National Science Foundation and Popular Science, your handiwork can receive its due glory and win you cash prizes. Find out more here.

2PM

(Source: makeupdramatics)

2PM
2PM

paulinaspassions:

Hope to brighten up your day with these cheerful roses!

Find more info here: http://paulinaspassions.com/bright-rose-nail-art-happy-yellow-background/

2PM

benedictcumberbatchsgirlfriend:

"Sherlock won’t return until 2016!"image

(via aiwa-sensei)

← Older entries Page 1 of 381